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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
hand on the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner's facing something of a revolt within gop's ranks over his budget plan. we'll have the latest from washington when we come back. >>> talks between the white house and republicans over the fiscal cliff have ran to something of a holt. john boehner dealing with division in the gop's ranks to his bung budget plan. another shanghai surprise. china's mainland market surge nearly 3%. more austerity. plus, austerity measures are hitting european consumers. retail sales in october fall much more than expected. september also revised sharply to the downside. >>> it was a flat day really for european stocks, slightly negative for u.s. stocks yesterday. we are a little bit higher. the dow is currently some 43 points above fair value. the nasdaq is around four points above fair value. the s&p 500 at the moment is around about four points above fair value. european stocks are up half a percent earlier. we have come off those highs. eurozone pmis a little bit better than expected. but still deeply in contraction territory. uk services pmis dipped
about the fiscal cliff, that is obvious. everybody is sitting back and waiting to see if washington can actually get something done. if political agendas can get it aside and think about the devastation that probably occurred with the fiscal cliff. the spring selling season begins in late january. we have been the bright spot in the economy. our industry are creating jobs, we're coming back in the early stages of a recovery so the fiscal cliff january 1 would have a huge impact on the country, and impact on our business, and we have our fingers crossed and are very hopeful washington can get something done and we'll have to see. but if they don't, there is no question there will be a little bit of time until things settle down when the buyers will hit the sidelines. liz: will it derail the tentative recovery here? >> right now we are three weeks away from this fiscal cliff date and we're still selling houses. i don't think it derails it, but there could be a pause until things get worked out. liz: part of it is being discussed, and that is the possible elimination or at least the cuttin
to discuss the fiscal cliff tug-of-war is a democrat from new york state, senior house of the financial services committee, representative meeks, good to have you with us. let's turn to entitlement spending. that is of high importance in solving the fiscal cliff negotiations and in a longer term way bringing the country to a sustainable fiscal course. what specific changes to medicare or medicaid would you be willing to imbraes today right new that would slow the growth in our medical spenting? >> i'm not going to debate the specifics on television. i think that what the president is doing, is clear that he has indicated that we have to raise the tax rate. the tax rates, bush tax cuts, was temporary in nature. >> that's not what i asked. i asked what specific would you be willing to do to address what is clearly the number one thing that is going to blow the hole in not only the economy but federal spending, federal budget over the next generation. >> what we have to do is negotiate. everything should be on the table. i think the president indicated that everything would be on the table
credit could go over the fiscal cliff. >> when swind placed on the surface of the earth, you can get something like 20 times the amount of power that civilization now uses. >> reporter: ken caldera authored a new study that claims wind is the way. >> the wind you can't power civilization on wind today has to do with economics and engineering. >> reporter: he points for history. >> one of the reasons why fossil fuels are cheap is that they have received large subsidies from the federal government. >> reporter: right now wind power gets a subsidy, too. $1 billion a year from uncle sam. but that could vanish december 31st when the country hits the fiscal cliff. to caldera, that's the short-run risk. in the long run, he sees a clear, if not political pristine, path to more reliance on wind power. >> i think we'll eventually get to the point where we see a need for technologies that can provide energy, essentially forever, with minimal environmental cost. >> a final check on the markets when we return after this. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] 'tis the season to discover the kid in al
ceos in that meeting agreed the tax rates for the wealthy have to rise as part of any fiscal cliff deal. he joins us exclusively later on "the closing bell." stay tuned. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... i'm with scottrade. >>> one of the most bizarre man hunts in recent memory is coming to an end in central america, we think. wealth editor robert frank has the latest details on the arrest of john mcafee. >> y
of strength on a lot of these things. i think the president takes his job seriously too. going over the fiscal cliff is not good for anyone. it bothers me sometimes if i hear people on both the left and the right entertain this is something that might be good politics. may be good politics for somebody, but it's bad economics for the american economy and more important for people looking for a job and people trying to hold on to a job. >> last question. i want to go back to the premise that you and other republican members of the house would be willing to allow that top tier tax rate to go higher. you know, speaker boehner's argument all this time is that it doesn't effect just those top-earning americans, but it also effects the small business owners in this country. the job creators in this country. >> the speaker's right about that. >> is that valid anymore? >> i'm not willing to -- i don't want to raise those. >> but you're willing to at least talk about it right now? >> they go up automatically. the sun's going to come up in the east tomorrow morning and set in the west. doesn't mean i ha
's not what the american people thought the fiscal cliff was about. they thought it was about trying to have something to force us, force our congress and our president to do something about the deficit and debt situation. everything they're talking about will make it worse. >> what's the answer? will we have the deal? >> the real answer is to have comprehensive. look at this. i as a republican, i would take raising the rates on the two top brackets if, in return, we had tax reform laid out over a period of months, if we had entitlement reform. we have to control defense spending. we have to control other no non- -- other discretionary non-defense spending. i think if you have the whole package, i would hold my nose despite the fact raising those two tax brackets is bad economics, bad for jobs, will hurt the economy, i would hold my nose to get the other done. what i wouldn't do is vote for that and do nothing else. >> agree completely. what i've been saying here. steve rattner. >> i agree completely. to get a big deal we all have to hold our nose a little bit and accept things we don't want
this discussion, this economy gets to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in recession. >> if something goes wrong, the fed has no arrows left in its quiver. >> we're checking our lists as the "squawk on the street" countdown to christmas continues. ho, ho, ho. ♪ >> andrew ross sorkin is bringing lloyd blankfein on stage. let's take a look. here's goldman sachs ceo lloyd blankfein. >> a number of people have touched on the fiscal cliff, and i wanted to start with that, but in a different way with you this morning, in that you have been active in washington over the past couple of weeks and all this. you've been on the phone with the white house. i've read reports that you were on the phone with the white house earlier this week. just if you could, take us behind the scenes. what goes on on these conference calls with the business community? sort of what do you see actually happening right now? >> i don't want to oversell this. i was on a couple of conference calls that the white house had with myself and other people who participated in meetings at the white house. i
. and -- >> but for everybody to -- to do that, to say we have to go over this fiscal cliff -- >> we don't have to -- >> in order so that everybody -- >> you could have legislation ready to introduce that week. >> congressman hensarling, before you go, something like that, would -- i mean i hear this from both sides, that if we just go over the president would introduce this legislation to lower rates, republicans who have signed grover norquist's pledge would be able to go along with that and say this is what we did. i didn't vote to raise taxes, i voted to lower taxes. is that the most likely scenario? >> makes sense? >> i'm not a las vegas bookie so i'm not going to say what is most likely scenario. i don't know and my crystal ball is a little fuzzy. again all this talk of taxes is marginally irrelevant. you give the president all of the tax increases that he has requested it's roughly about 23% of his ten-year spending budget. even 1.6 trillion. at most is maybe, 22%, 23%. the additional -- >> but going over that cliff, that's real money. and by the way, that's not that revenue thing. that'
a business network, i have to ask you, you're a businessman. does this fiscal cliff stuff worry you and the prospect of higher taxes worry you? what do you think? >> i think it worries all of us, doesn't it? i'm one that has faith. i believe something is going to happen. i believe we'll have a deal before it gets over the cliff personally. i'm an optimist. >> you're in farming. you have a guesthouse on your land down in georgia. what do you your customers tell you about the state of the economy? >> we get varying points of view from the discussions we have at the plantation. again, i think the majority of folks that come and, you know, have discussions of all types, especially when it gets to the economy, they are optimists and they feel like the country is getting better, albeit more slowly than we would all like. but i think the overall feeling is that it's going to be okay. just take a deep breath, move forward. >> let's turn to music, shall we, steve, come on. >> if you don't know one of the things he's famous for, rolling stones, 1982 but the most classic piano solo in the hist
and decided to roll a debt ceiling extension in to the fiscal cliff deal whatever they end up striking here and seems to me acknowledging republicans have leverage with cpi and talking about raising the medicare age. my question to you as a progressive is, republicans want something big. is there any big concessions you can see acceptable? >> new york city i really can't. and the kind of things we are talking about, even if they're not -- may not be acceptable to me ever but talking about a version of the changed cpi, the president already said social security is off the table because it is not driving the deficit. that's kind of weird. changes to medicare eligibility again or changes to medicare payments or whatever, it's really complicated to negotiate but i have to say i agree with you, steve. i'm -- i wish that the president hadn't taken the 14th amendment off the table because we're all saying, well, nothing should be off the table. why is that off the table and even if it's tough thing to pull off in the long run? i think that this mania for a fiscal cliff deal is disturbing but i thi
cliff. >> i know, the way he said that was unnerving. let me tell you something. >> it's also just that egotism that everybody reacts to. >> i was in china for ten days and with a group of mayors, the mayor of philadelphia, beijing, mayor nutter. and you know, people in china are asking about the fiscal cliff. everywhere we went. what's going on with you people? so the world is watching. and it's not just us. and i don't care, maybe you think the chinese, well, too bad for them, but it's not just the chinese, it's europe, and they're blaming the fact that their economies aren't going based on the fact that we're in this stalemate. you know, it's huge. >> harold, i mean, it all comes down to leadership. you know, when you talk to business owners, they want leadership shown. i'm glad the president is talking to business leaders now. >> and a debater on the phone. >> not only the administration but also on the other side of pennsylvania avenue with the republicans and harry reid in the senate. you're just not seeing it. >> you don't see enough of it. curiously, the markets -- investor
about something else. >> couldn't the sandy weakness then be followed by fiscal cliff worry weakness. even if we don't go over the cliff. we could go above 8% and all of a sudden -- >> we could. and i'm expecting over 8% today or around 8% or more. and just to explain, there's a couple things going on. it's an earlier thanksgiving. so as i understand it, the bls moved survey week backwards to 11/5 from 111/12. that means it further back into the teeth of sandy's effects. all the peek out ople out of wo couldn't find work if they were looking for it. however the earlier thanksgiving also means retailers hire earlier. so you have these two forces. and zandi said there was two things, plus 86 from sandy, minus 60 or 70 because you have a seasonal effect of earlier retailers. on the jobs number. on the jobs number. so these offset? hiring for retail means a positive. less hiring for -- because of sandy is a negative. could they offset? >> there has to be some netting. there are special effects in the reports you're trying to sort out. and there's also the question of what the the economy
today. it's over. why inject the politics? why go there? with so much going on, the fiscal cliff, negotiating back and forth with the house trying to figure out how to avoid massive tax increases and spending cuts, why there? it's all politics. >> steve: one other note, the "wall street journal" says regarding right to work states, between 2000 and 2010, 5 million people moved from union states to right to work states and they have 23% higher rate of income growth per capita in right to work states. so things are thriving in the right to work states. there are 24 of them. 26 still are union states. >> gretchen: eric brought up an interesting point about why isn't the president staying in washington, because now it turns out that the fiscal cliff is actually closer than we thought. it was not coakley january 1 anymore. we've about to go off it any day now because apparently it takes a certain amount of days to actually draft any kind of legislation that they might come to an agreement on and so if you backtrack then from the end of the year and when congress is going to be going h
anything done. the fiscal cliff hits. the arguments i just pa about the withholding tables and cutting spending, are not generally talked about. a lot of people deny they can be done. we're confident they can. so the question then becomes what's the impact, where is the impact. and the impact is equity markets end of next week will say these guys aren't going to get it done, we won't have a deal january 1, everything falls apart, that's assuming of course we all get past december 21st. >> so basically week and counting before you think the equity market really drops significantly? >> if we do get a deal done do, we just maintain the 2% that we're stuck in with the high unemployment and not go down? or does it actually allow us to start growing again? is anybody talking growth? >> we're talking growth. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)